Traveling to take care of back pain (or carpal tunnel) part 2

Yesterday I wrote about chiropractic and ART in New York. When we returned to Korea, we looked into getting more chiropractic but we didn’t find anyone certified in ART (though one doctor said he was and simply didn’t have enough ART patients to be listed on the official site – not sure if I believe that).

Anyhow, we probably will end up going to a chiropractor soon but we wanted to try something different and compare so we ended up going to Dr. Raimund Royer (a rare Austrian practicing Oriental medicine) at Jaesng for chuna and acupuncture. I’m told that Chuna is an old Chinese traditional thing. To me it’s like a subdued version of chiropractics. They twist your neck and back a little bit but not much and you only hear a few (if any) bones cracking.

On our first visit, the doctor recommended an MRI and diganosed my wife with some degenerate discs. She’s been getting treatment for that while I’m getting treatment for various aches and pains, basically whatever feels sore or stiff that day.

At first, I wanted more from the chuna – I felt like lots of stuff would start popping if the doctor would only push a little harder. Now, after 8 visits I think, I’m pretty used to it and like it just fine (though I do plan to go back to chiropractics soon for a comparison). MY wife’s back is in pretty good shape so the chuna plus acupuncture seems to be as effective as the chiropractic care and ART was.

For me, this is the best acupuncture I’ve had. I get herbal acupuncture while my wife gets bee venom (an anti-inflammatory) acupuncture. In my case they stick some herbal stuff in there before doing the normal acupuncture and I’ve felt better 7/8 times which is better than I’ve done with normal acupuncture. As I mentioned, my wife is doing well so the bee venom stuff must be helping her back.

My wife also gets treated for her carpal tunnel but the bee venom leaves her wrist pretty itchy (her back doesn’t get as itchy) and she’s not convinced it’s making a big difference. She felt a small improvement in the beginning but now she isn’t so sure.

And actually, the acupuncture may be saving me from getting another surgery for an infected sweat gland (at least that’s what I think it is this time). The last two times I’ve gotten acupuncture in the swollen area and it hurts quite a bit but it beats going to the hospital for surgery so it’s worth a try. So far the swelling has decreased and the area is no longer painful to touch so I am encouraged.

In the end, I recommend chuna, herbal acupuncture, and all that good stuff. I know most of you don’t live in Seoul but I think they have a branch in LA and here in Seoul they do take medical tourists and my wife happens to be a tour guide so if you wanted to come to Seoul and try out chuna we could try to work something out.

Filed Under: Medical tourism

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  1. aganuls says:

    For me, this is the best acupuncture I’ve had. I get herbal acupuncture while my wife gets bee venom (an anti-inflammatory) acupuncture. In my case they stick some herbal stuff in there before doing the normal acupuncture and I’ve felt better 7/8 times which is better than I’ve done with normal acupuncture.medical supply Malaysia

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